How Do You Say “What Happens Happens” In French?

Learning a new language can be an exciting and daunting task. With French being one of the most popular languages to learn, it’s no wonder that many people are interested in mastering it. Whether you’re planning a trip to Paris or simply looking to expand your linguistic abilities, learning French can be a fulfilling experience. One phrase that you may come across in your studies is “what happens happens”. In French, this phrase is translated to “ce qui doit arriver arrivera”.

How Do You Pronounce The French Word For “What Happens Happens”?

Learning to properly pronounce French words can be challenging for non-native speakers. However, with the right guidance and practice, you can master the pronunciation of the phrase “what happens happens” in French.

Phonetic Breakdown

The French phrase for “what happens happens” is “ce qui doit arriver arrive.” Here is a phonetic breakdown of each word:

Word Phonetic Spelling
Ce suh
qui kee
doit dwa
arriver ah-ree-vay
arrive ah-reev

Tips For Pronunciation

Here are some tips to help you pronounce “ce qui doit arriver arrive” correctly:

  • Practice saying each word separately before putting them together.
  • Focus on the correct stress and intonation of each word.
  • Pay attention to the placement of your tongue, lips, and jaw when making each sound.
  • Listen to native speakers and try to imitate their pronunciation.

With regular practice and persistence, you can improve your French pronunciation skills and confidently say “ce qui doit arriver arrive” like a native speaker.

Proper Grammatical Use Of The French Word For “What Happens Happens”

Proper grammar is essential when using the French word for “what happens happens”. This phrase, which translates to “ce qui doit arriver arrivera”, is commonly used in French to express the idea that events will unfold as they are meant to, regardless of one’s efforts or desires. To use this phrase correctly, it is important to pay attention to its placement in a sentence, verb conjugations or tenses, agreement with gender and number, and any common exceptions.

Placement In Sentences

The French phrase “ce qui doit arriver arrivera” can be used as a subject or an object in a sentence. When used as a subject, it is placed at the beginning of the sentence. For example:

  • Ce qui doit arriver arrivera.
  • (What happens happens.)

When used as an object, it is placed after the verb. For example:

  • Je sais que ce qui doit arriver arrivera.
  • (I know that what happens happens.)

Verb Conjugations Or Tenses

The verb “arriver” is a regular -er verb in French, which means that it follows a predictable conjugation pattern. When conjugating “arriver” in the present tense to match the subject, use the following endings:

Subject Ending
Je -e
Tu -es
Il/Elle/On -e
Nous -ons
Vous -ez
Ils/Elles -ent

For example:

  • Je sais que ce qui arrive arrivera.
  • (I know that what happens will happen.)

Agreement With Gender And Number

The French phrase “ce qui doit arriver arrivera” is grammatically neutral, which means that it does not change depending on the gender or number of the subject or object. For example:

  • Ce qui doit arriver arrivera.
  • (What happens happens.)
  • Ce qui doit arriver arrivera demain.
  • (What happens happens tomorrow.)
  • Ce qui doit arriver arrivera tôt ou tard.
  • (What happens happens sooner or later.)

Common Exceptions

There are no common exceptions to the proper grammatical use of the French phrase “ce qui doit arriver arrivera”. However, it is important to note that this phrase is often used in a fatalistic or resigned context, expressing the idea that events are predetermined and beyond one’s control. As such, it may not be appropriate in all situations and should be used with care.

Examples Of Phrases Using The French Word For “What Happens Happens”

French is a beautiful language that is spoken by millions of people all around the world. One of the most commonly used phrases in French is “ce qui doit arriver arrivera,” which translates to “what happens happens.” This phrase is used to express the idea that some things are beyond our control and that we should accept them as they are.

Provide Examples And Explain How They Are Used In Sentences.

Here are some examples of how the French phrase “ce qui doit arriver arrivera” can be used in sentences:

  • “Je suis inquiet à propos de l’examen, mais ce qui doit arriver arrivera.” (I’m worried about the exam, but what happens happens.)
  • “Je ne peux pas contrôler la météo, ce qui doit arriver arrivera.” (I can’t control the weather, what happens happens.)
  • “Je suis désolé pour ce qui s’est passé, mais ce qui doit arriver arrivera.” (I’m sorry for what happened, but what happens happens.)

As you can see, this phrase is often used to express acceptance or resignation in a situation where things are beyond our control. It can be used in a variety of contexts, from personal relationships to professional situations.

Provide Some Example French Dialogue (With Translations) Using The French Word For What Happens Happens.

Here is an example of a conversation in French that uses the phrase “ce qui doit arriver arrivera”:

French Dialogue English Translation
“Je suis tellement stressé à propos de l’entretien demain.” “I’m so stressed about the interview tomorrow.”
“Ne t’inquiète pas, ce qui doit arriver arrivera.” “Don’t worry, what happens happens.”
“Mais que se passera-t-il si je ne suis pas embauché?” “But what will happen if I don’t get the job?”
“Nous trouverons une autre opportunité. Ce qui doit arriver arrivera.” “We’ll find another opportunity. What happens happens.”

As you can see, the phrase “ce qui doit arriver arrivera” can be used to comfort someone who is worried or stressed about a situation. It can also be used to express the idea that there are always other opportunities out there, and that we should not be too attached to any one outcome.

More Contextual Uses Of The French Word For “What Happens Happens”

Understanding the contextual uses of the French word for “what happens happens,” or “ce qui est fait est fait,” is crucial for effective communication in the French language. Here are some of the different contexts in which this phrase can be used:

Formal Usage

In formal situations, “ce qui est fait est fait” is often used to convey a sense of inevitability. It can be used to express acceptance of a situation that cannot be changed or to acknowledge that a mistake has been made and cannot be undone. For example, a manager might use this phrase when discussing a decision that was made by the company’s leadership:

  • “Ce qui est fait est fait. Nous devons maintenant nous concentrer sur l’avenir.”
  • “What’s done is done. We must now focus on the future.”

Informal Usage

In more casual settings, “ce qui est fait est fait” can be used to express resignation or to brush off a mistake. For example, a friend might use this phrase when discussing a minor mishap:

  • “Ah, ce qui est fait est fait. On ne peut pas changer le passé!”
  • “Ah, what’s done is done. We can’t change the past!”

Other Contexts

In addition to formal and informal usage, “ce qui est fait est fait” can also be used in a variety of other contexts. For example, it may be used in slang or idiomatic expressions, or it may have cultural or historical significance. Here are a few examples:

  • “Faire ce qui est fait” – to do what needs to be done
  • “Le mal est fait” – the damage is done
  • “C’est fait pour moi” – it’s done for me (i.e. it’s perfect)
  • In historical context, this phrase has been used to describe the inevitability of war or other major events.

Popular Cultural Usage

One popular cultural usage of “ce qui est fait est fait” can be found in the song “Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien” by Edith Piaf. The chorus of the song includes the lyrics:

Non, je ne regrette rien
Ni le bien qu’on m’a fait, ni le mal
Tout ça m’est bien égal
Non, je ne regrette rien

Translated to English, the first line of the chorus means “No, I regret nothing.” This sentiment is similar to the idea of “ce qui est fait est fait” – that the past cannot be changed and there is no use in regretting it.

Regional Variations Of The French Word For “What Happens Happens”

French is a language that has evolved over time and has many regional variations. The French word for “what happens happens” is no exception. In different French-speaking countries, this phrase can be expressed in various ways, and the pronunciation can vary significantly.

Usage Across French-speaking Countries

In France, the phrase “what happens happens” is commonly expressed as “ce qui doit arriver arrivera.” In Canada, the French-speaking province of Quebec has its own unique variation, which is “ce qui doit arriver arrivera bien.” In Belgium, the phrase “what happens happens” is translated as “ce qui doit arriver arrivera toujours.”

It is essential to note that in other French-speaking countries, such as Switzerland, Morocco, and Tunisia, the phrase “what happens happens” is not commonly used. Instead, they may use a different expression that has a similar meaning.

Regional Pronunciations

As with any language, pronunciation can vary widely depending on the region. In France, the pronunciation of “ce qui doit arriver arrivera” can vary from region to region, with some areas pronouncing it with a stronger emphasis on the “r” sound.

In Quebec, the pronunciation of “ce qui doit arriver arrivera bien” is unique, with a more prominent emphasis on the “b” sound in “bien.”

In Belgium, the pronunciation of “ce qui doit arriver arrivera toujours” can vary depending on the region. In some areas, the “r” sound is pronounced more strongly, while in others, the emphasis is on the “t” sound in “toujours.”

Regional variations in language are fascinating and can provide insight into the culture and history of a region. The French language is no exception, with many regional variations in pronunciation and usage of common phrases such as “what happens happens.” Understanding these variations can help you communicate more effectively with French speakers from different regions and appreciate the rich diversity of the French language.

Other Uses Of The French Word For “What Happens Happens” In Speaking & Writing

While “ce qui doit arriver arrivera” is commonly used to express the idea that what will happen will happen, it can also have different meanings depending on the context in which it is used. It is important to be able to distinguish between these uses in order to fully understand the message being conveyed.

Use As Fatalistic Statement

The most common use of “ce qui doit arriver arrivera” is as a fatalistic statement, expressing the idea that events are predetermined and cannot be changed. In this context, the phrase is often used to convey a sense of resignation or acceptance in the face of adversity.

Example: “Je ne peux pas changer les choses, ce qui doit arriver arrivera.” (I cannot change things, what will happen will happen.)

Use As Motivational Statement

On the other hand, “ce qui doit arriver arrivera” can also be used as a motivational statement, encouraging people to take action and not be afraid of the future. In this context, the phrase is often used to convey a sense of optimism and empowerment.

Example: “Nous ne pouvons pas prédire l’avenir, mais nous pouvons travailler dur pour réaliser nos rêves. Ce qui doit arriver arrivera.” (We cannot predict the future, but we can work hard to achieve our dreams. What will happen will happen.)

Use As Philosophical Statement

Finally, “ce qui doit arriver arrivera” can also be used as a philosophical statement, expressing the idea that events are part of a larger plan or destiny. In this context, the phrase is often used to convey a sense of wisdom and understanding.

Example: “Nous ne pouvons pas contrôler les événements de la vie, mais nous pouvons contrôler notre réaction à ces événements. Ce qui doit arriver arrivera.” (We cannot control the events of life, but we can control our reaction to those events. What will happen will happen.)

Distinguishing Between Uses

While the different uses of “ce qui doit arriver arrivera” may seem similar, there are subtle differences in tone and context that can help distinguish between them. Paying attention to the speaker’s tone, the context in which the phrase is used, and the overall message being conveyed can help you understand the meaning of the phrase in any given situation.

Use Tone Context Message
Fatalistic Resigned, Accepting In the face of adversity Events are predetermined and cannot be changed
Motivational Optimistic, Empowering Encouraging action Don’t be afraid of the future, take control of your destiny
Philosophical Wise, Understanding Reflective Events are part of a larger plan or destiny

Common Words And Phrases Similar To The French Word For “What Happens Happens”

When it comes to expressing the idea of “what happens happens” in French, there are a variety of words and phrases that can be used. Here are some of the most common:

1. C’est La Vie

C’est la vie is a common French expression that translates to “that’s life” or “such is life”. It is often used to express acceptance of a situation that cannot be changed or control, similar to “what happens happens”.

2. Tout Arrive

Tout arrive translates to “everything happens” and can be used to express the same sentiment as “what happens happens”. It conveys the idea that unexpected events can occur at any time and that we must accept them as they come.

3. ÇA Se Passe Comme çA

Ça se passe comme ça translates to “it happens like that” and can be used to express the idea that sometimes things happen in a certain way and we cannot change them. It is similar to “what happens happens” in that it conveys a sense of acceptance of the situation.

While these phrases are similar in meaning to “what happens happens”, they are not exact synonyms and may be used in slightly different contexts.

Antonyms

Antonyms of “what happens happens” would be phrases that convey the opposite sentiment of acceptance. These might include phrases such as:

  • Control your destiny
  • Make things happen
  • Take charge of your life

These phrases suggest that we have the power to shape our own lives and that we should actively work towards achieving our goals, rather than simply accepting what comes our way.

Mistakes To Avoid When Using The French Word For “What Happens Happens”

When non-native speakers attempt to use the French phrase “what happens happens,” they often make common mistakes that can lead to confusion or miscommunication. One of the most common errors is using the wrong verb tense. In French, the phrase is typically expressed in the present tense, but non-native speakers may mistakenly use the future or past tense instead. Another mistake is using the wrong preposition, such as “de” instead of “à,” when expressing the idea of “what happens to someone.”

Highlight These Mistakes And Provide Tips To Avoid Them.

To avoid these mistakes, non-native speakers should focus on learning the correct verb tense and preposition for expressing the idea of “what happens happens” in French. Here are some tips to help:

  • Practice using the present tense form of the phrase, which is “ce qui arrive arrive.”
  • Remember to use the preposition “à” when expressing the idea of “what happens to someone.” For example, “ce qui arrive à moi” means “what happens to me.”
  • Listen to native speakers and pay attention to how they use the phrase in context.
  • Use online resources such as language learning apps or websites to help improve your understanding of French grammar and vocabulary.

By avoiding these common mistakes and practicing the correct usage of the phrase, non-native speakers can improve their ability to communicate effectively in French.

Conclusion

After reading this blog post, you should now have a clear understanding of how to say “what happens happens” in French. We have discussed the different translations of this phrase, including “ce qui doit arriver arrivera” and “laisser faire les choses.”

It is important to note that these phrases may not always be used in the exact same context as the English phrase “what happens happens.” However, they convey a similar sentiment of accepting that events will unfold as they are meant to.

As with any language skill, the key to mastery is practice. We encourage you to use these phrases in your real-life conversations with French speakers. Not only will this enhance your language abilities, but it will also demonstrate your appreciation for the French culture and language.

Shawn Manaher

Shawn Manaher is the founder and CEO of The Content Authority and Transl8it.com. He’s a seasoned innovator, harnessing the power of technology to connect cultures through language. His worse translation though is when he refers to “pancakes” as “flat waffles”.