How Do You Say “That Kid” In French?

Bonjour! Have you ever found yourself wondering how to say “that kid” in French? Perhaps you’re a parent trying to communicate with your child’s French-speaking friend, or maybe you’re a language enthusiast looking to expand your vocabulary. Whatever your reason, learning new words and phrases in another language can be a fun and rewarding experience. So, without further ado, let’s explore the French translation of “that kid”.

The French translation for “that kid” is “ce gamin”. “Ce” means “that” and “gamin” means “kid” or “young boy”. However, it’s important to note that “gamin” is more informal and colloquial than “enfant”, which is the more formal word for “child” or “kid”. So, if you’re in a more formal setting, it may be more appropriate to use “enfant” instead of “gamin”.

How Do You Pronounce The French Word For “That Kid”?

Learning to properly pronounce French words can be a challenging yet rewarding experience. One word that may have you stumped is the French term for “that kid.” The word is spelled “enfant” and is pronounced “ahn-fahn” in French.

Here is a phonetic breakdown of the word “enfant”:

  • First syllable “ahn” is pronounced like the “on” in “gone.”
  • Second syllable “fahn” is pronounced like the “fan” in “fanatic.”

To properly pronounce “enfant,” it’s important to pay attention to the stress on the first syllable. The “ahn” sound should be emphasized, with the “fahn” sound being pronounced more softly.

Here are a few tips for pronouncing “enfant” correctly:

  1. Practice saying the word slowly and emphasizing the first syllable.
  2. Listen to native French speakers pronounce the word and try to mimic their pronunciation.
  3. Break the word down into its syllables and practice saying each syllable separately before putting them together.

With a little practice and patience, you’ll soon be able to confidently pronounce the French word for “that kid” like a native speaker.

Proper Grammatical Use Of The French Word For “That Kid”

Proper grammar is essential when using any language, including French. The French language has its own unique set of rules that must be followed to communicate effectively. When using the French word for “that kid,” it is crucial to understand the proper grammatical use to avoid any confusion or miscommunication.

Placement Of The French Word For “That Kid” In Sentences

The French word for “that kid” is “ce gamin” or “cette gamine.” The placement of the word in a sentence is essential to convey the correct meaning. In French, adjectives typically come after the noun they describe. Therefore, “ce” or “cette” (depending on the gender of the noun) comes before the noun, followed by the adjective “gamin” or “gamine.”

For example:

  • “That kid is playing” would be translated to “Ce gamin joue” or “Cette gamine joue.”
  • “I like that kid” would be translated to “J’aime ce gamin” or “J’aime cette gamine.”

Verb Conjugations Or Tenses

Verb conjugations or tenses are essential in French to indicate the time and mood of the action. When using the French word for “that kid” with verbs, the verb must be conjugated to agree with the subject.

For example:

  • “That kid is running” would be translated to “Ce gamin court” or “Cette gamine court.”
  • “I saw that kid” would be translated to “J’ai vu ce gamin” or “J’ai vu cette gamine.”

Agreement With Gender And Number

In French, adjectives must agree with the gender and number of the noun they describe. Therefore, when using the French word for “that kid,” the adjective “gamin” or “gamine” must agree with the gender and number of the noun it describes.

For example:

  • “That boy is playing” would be translated to “Ce gamin joue.”
  • “That girl is playing” would be translated to “Cette gamine joue.”
  • “Those kids are playing” would be translated to “Ces gamins jouent.”
  • “Those girls are playing” would be translated to “Ces gamines jouent.”

Common Exceptions

As with any language, there are exceptions to the rules. One common exception when using the French word for “that kid” is when it is used as a term of endearment. In this case, it can be used without an adjective and in the masculine form, regardless of the child’s gender.

For example:

  • “Come here, my little kid” would be translated to “Viens ici, mon petit gamin.”

Examples Of Phrases Using The French Word For “That Kid”

When learning a new language, it’s important to familiarize yourself with common phrases and expressions. In French, the word for “that kid” is “ce gamin” or “cette gamine” for a female. Here are some examples of phrases that include the French word for “that kid”:

Examples:

  • “Ce gamin est très intelligent.” (That kid is very intelligent.)
  • “Je n’aime pas cette gamine.” (I don’t like that kid.)
  • “Où est ce gamin?” (Where is that kid?)
  • “C’est un bon gamin.” (He’s a good kid.)
  • “Elle est une gamine très drôle.” (She’s a very funny kid.)

As you can see, the French word for “that kid” can be used in a variety of contexts and situations. It’s a versatile word that can be used to describe children of different ages and genders.

Example French Dialogue:

French English Translation
“Salut, ça va?” “Hi, how are you?”
“Ça va bien, merci. Et toi?” “I’m good, thanks. And you?”
“Oui, ça va bien. Tu as vu ce gamin là-bas?” “Yes, I’m good. Have you seen that kid over there?”
“Oui, je l’ai vu. C’est le fils de mon voisin.” “Yes, I’ve seen him. He’s my neighbor’s son.”
“Il est très mignon.” “He’s very cute.”

In this example dialogue, the French word for “that kid” is used to refer to a child who is nearby. It’s a common way to point out someone in a conversation and can be used in both formal and informal settings.

More Contextual Uses Of The French Word For “That Kid”

Understanding the various contexts in which the French word for “that kid” is used can be helpful for anyone learning the language. Here are some of the most common contexts:

Formal Usage

In formal situations, such as in business or academic settings, the French word for “that kid” is rarely used. Instead, more formal terms such as “enfant” (child) or “jeune” (young person) may be used. It’s important to note that using the wrong term in a formal context can come across as disrespectful or unprofessional.

Informal Usage

In informal settings, the French word for “that kid” is more commonly used. The most common term is “gamin” which can be used to refer to a mischievous or playful child. Other informal terms include “môme” and “gosse”. These terms are often used among friends or family members but may be considered too casual in more formal settings.

Other Contexts

There are also other contexts in which the French word for “that kid” is used. For example, in certain regions of France, “chérubin” is used to refer to a very young child. In addition, there are many slang and idiomatic expressions that use the word “gamin” or “gosse” such as “un petit gars” (a little guy) or “un moutard” (a brat). It’s important to understand the context in which these terms are used to avoid any misunderstandings.

Popular Cultural Usage

The French word for “that kid” has been used in numerous cultural and historical contexts. For example, in the popular French children’s book “Le Petit Prince”, the main character is often referred to as “le petit prince” (the little prince). In addition, the French film “Les Quatre Cents Coups” (The 400 Blows) tells the story of a young boy growing up in Paris and is often referred to as a “gamin”.

Overall, understanding the various contexts in which the French word for “that kid” is used can help you navigate the language more effectively and avoid any cultural misunderstandings.

Regional Variations Of The French Word For “That Kid”

French is spoken in many countries around the world, and as with any language, there are regional variations in the way words are used and pronounced. The French word for “that kid” is no exception, and its usage can vary depending on the country or region in which it is spoken.

Usage In Different French-speaking Countries

In France, the most common word for “that kid” is “ce gamin” or “cette gamine” for a girl. In Quebec, Canada, the word is “c’t’enfant” or “c’te p’tite”. In Belgium, children might be referred to as “ce mouflet” or “cette mouflette”. In Switzerland, “ce mioche” or “cette mioche” might be used.

It’s worth noting that there may be variations within each country or region as well. For example, in Quebec, “c’t’enfant” might be more commonly used in some areas than others.

Regional Pronunciations

Along with variations in usage, there can also be differences in the way the word is pronounced. For example, in France, “ce gamin” might be pronounced with a hard “g” sound, while in Quebec, “c’t’enfant” might be pronounced with a more nasal tone.

Here is a table summarizing some of the regional variations in pronunciation:

Country/Region Word for “That Kid” Pronunciation
France “ce gamin” or “cette gamine” hard “g” sound
Quebec, Canada “c’t’enfant” or “c’te p’tite” more nasal tone
Belgium “ce mouflet” or “cette mouflette” varies by region
Switzerland “ce mioche” or “cette mioche” varies by region

Other Uses Of The French Word For “That Kid” In Speaking & Writing

While the French word for “that kid” is commonly used to refer to a child, it can also have various other meanings depending on the context in which it is used. Here are some of the other uses of this word and how to distinguish between them:

1. Referring To A Young Person

One of the most common uses of the French word for “that kid” is to refer to a young person. In this context, the word can be used to describe anyone from a toddler to a teenager. For example:

  • Je vais chercher ce gamin à l’école. (I’m going to pick up that kid from school.)
  • Les gamins adorent les bonbons. (Kids love candy.)

To distinguish this use from others, pay attention to the age of the person being referred to and the overall context of the conversation.

2. Referring To A Young Animal

Another use of the French word for “that kid” is to refer to a young animal, particularly a goat or a lamb. In this context, the word is often used in the plural form “les gamins” to refer to a group of young animals. For example:

  • Les gamins de la chèvre sont adorables. (The goat kids are adorable.)
  • Les gamins de l’agneau sont très doux. (The lamb kids are very soft.)

To distinguish this use from others, pay attention to the type of animal being referred to and the overall context of the conversation.

3. Referring To A Young Criminal

Finally, the French word for “that kid” can also be used to refer to a young criminal, particularly in slang or informal contexts. In this context, the word is often used in the singular form “le gamin” to refer to a specific young person who is engaging in criminal activity. For example:

  • Le gamin a volé mon portefeuille. (That kid stole my wallet.)
  • Les gamins du quartier sont toujours en train de faire des bêtises. (The kids in the neighborhood are always up to no good.)

To distinguish this use from others, pay attention to the criminal activity being referred to and the overall context of the conversation.

Common Words And Phrases Similar To The French Word For “That Kid”

When it comes to referring to a child in French, there are many words and phrases that can be used interchangeably with the word “enfant” (kid). Here are some of the most common:

1. Gamin/gamine

Gamin or gamine is a colloquial term used to refer to a young boy or girl respectively. It has a playful connotation and is often used affectionately. For instance, “Ce gamin est très mignon” translates to “This kid is very cute.”

2. Petit/petite

Petit or petite means “little” in French and can be used to describe a child of any gender. It is often used as an endearing term, especially when addressing a child. For example, “Comment ça va, ma petite?” translates to “How are you, my little one?”

3. Bambin/bambine

Bambin or bambine means “toddler” or “little child” in French. It is often used to refer to a child who is still learning to walk and talk. For instance, “Le bambin a marché pour la première fois” translates to “The toddler walked for the first time.”

4. Môme

Môme is a colloquial term that is used to refer to a child, especially a young boy. It has a playful connotation and is often used affectionately. For example, “Ce môme est très doué” translates to “This kid is very talented.”

5. Fils/fille

Fils or fille means “son” or “daughter” respectively in French. It is often used to refer to a child in a formal context, such as when filling out official documents. For instance, “Le fils de mon frère s’appelle Paul” translates to “My brother’s son is named Paul.”

Antonyms

While there are many words and phrases that can be used to refer to a child in French, there are also some antonyms that are worth noting. These include:

  • Adulte (adult)
  • Vieux/vieille (old)
  • Sérieux/sérieuse (serious)

These words are used to describe people who are not children and have a more mature or serious demeanor.

Mistakes To Avoid When Using The French Word For “That Kid”

When using the French word for “that kid,” there are some common mistakes made by non-native speakers. These mistakes can lead to confusion or miscommunication, so it’s important to be aware of them. Some of the most common errors include:

  • Using the wrong word for “kid” – In French, there are different words for “kid” depending on the age and gender of the child. Using the wrong word can lead to confusion or offense.
  • Incorrect pronunciation – French pronunciation can be tricky, and mispronouncing the word for “kid” can make it difficult for native speakers to understand what you’re saying.
  • Misusing articles – French articles (such as “le” and “la”) must agree in gender and number with the noun they modify. Using the wrong article can change the meaning of the sentence.

Highlight These Mistakes And Provide Tips To Avoid Them.

To avoid these common mistakes when using the French word for “that kid,” follow these tips:

  1. Use the correct word for “kid” – In French, “kid” can be translated as “enfant” (child), “garçon” (boy), or “fille” (girl). Make sure to use the correct word depending on the age and gender of the child you’re referring to.
  2. Practice correct pronunciation – French pronunciation can be difficult, but practicing can help. Make sure to pronounce the final consonant in “enfant” and the “ç” sound in “garçon” correctly.
  3. Pay attention to articles – French articles must agree in gender and number with the noun they modify. Pay attention to whether the child is male or female, and whether the word for “kid” is singular or plural.

By following these tips, you can avoid common mistakes when using the French word for “that kid” and communicate more effectively with native speakers.

Conclusion

Throughout this blog post, we have explored the different ways to say “that kid” in French. We started by discussing the most common term, “ce petit,” which is a direct translation of the English phrase. We then moved on to more colloquial and regional expressions, such as “ce gamin” and “ce gosse,” which convey a sense of youthfulness and playfulness.

Additionally, we touched on the importance of context when using these terms, as they can have different connotations depending on the situation. For example, “ce gosse” may be used affectionately between family members, but could be seen as disrespectful when used towards a stranger.

Finally, we explored some related vocabulary, including synonyms for “kid” and other French expressions that convey youthfulness and energy.

Encouragement To Practice

Now that we have a better understanding of how to say “that kid” in French, it’s time to start using these phrases in real-life conversations. Don’t be afraid to practice with native speakers or language exchange partners, and remember to pay attention to the context in which these expressions are used.

By incorporating these terms into your French vocabulary, you’ll be able to express yourself more fluently and accurately, and connect with French speakers on a deeper level.

So go ahead and give it a try! With a little practice, you’ll be using these expressions like a pro in no time.

Shawn Manaher

Shawn Manaher is the founder and CEO of The Content Authority and Transl8it.com. He’s a seasoned innovator, harnessing the power of technology to connect cultures through language. His worse translation though is when he refers to “pancakes” as “flat waffles”.