How Do You Say “Plastered” In Spanish?

Spanish is a beautiful language that is spoken by over 580 million people worldwide. Learning a new language can be an exciting and rewarding experience. It allows you to communicate with people from different cultures, enhances your career prospects, and opens up a whole new world of literature and entertainment. If you’re learning Spanish, you may come across words that are difficult to translate. One of these words is “plastered,” which has several translations in Spanish depending on its context.

The Spanish translation of “plastered” is “borracho.” This word is commonly used to describe someone who is drunk or intoxicated. However, there are other ways to say “plastered” in Spanish depending on the situation. For example, if you want to say that a wall is plastered, you would use the word “enlucido.” On the other hand, if you want to say that someone is covered in plaster, you would use the word “enyesado.”

How Do You Pronounce The Spanish Word For “Plastered”?

Learning to properly pronounce words in a foreign language can be challenging, but it is an essential part of effective communication. If you’re wondering how to say “plastered” in Spanish, it’s important to understand the correct pronunciation. The phonetic spelling of the word is “pla-sté-ra-do”.

Phonetic Breakdown

The Spanish word for “plastered” is spelled “plastreado” and is pronounced as follows:

Letter/Group of Letters Pronunciation
Pl pl
A ah
S s
T t
Re reh
A ah
Do doh

Tips For Pronunciation

Here are some tips to help you properly pronounce “plastreado” in Spanish:

  • Focus on pronouncing each syllable distinctly and evenly.
  • Pay attention to the accent on the second-to-last syllable, which is stressed.
  • Practice saying the word slowly at first, then gradually increase your speed.
  • Listen to native speakers pronounce the word and try to mimic their pronunciation.

With these tips in mind, you’ll be able to confidently pronounce “plastreado” in Spanish like a pro!

Proper Grammatical Use Of The Spanish Word For “Plastered”

When speaking or writing in Spanish, it is important to use proper grammar to ensure that your message is clear and concise. This is especially true when using the word “plastered,” which can have different meanings depending on its context and how it is used. Below are some guidelines for using the Spanish word for “plastered” correctly.

Placement Of Plastered In Sentences

Plastered is usually used as an adjective to describe someone who is very drunk or intoxicated. In Spanish, the word for “plastered” is “borracho” or “ebrio.” When using this word in a sentence, it is usually placed after the noun it is describing. For example:

  • Estaba borracho después de beber toda la noche. (He was plastered after drinking all night.)
  • La fiesta estaba llena de gente ebria. (The party was full of plastered people.)

Verb Conjugations Or Tenses

When using the word “plastered” in a sentence, it is not necessary to conjugate the verb. However, it is important to use the correct tense depending on the context of the sentence. For example:

  • Estaba borracho después de beber toda la noche. (He was plastered after drinking all night.) – Past tense
  • Si bebes demasiado, te pondrás ebrio. (If you drink too much, you will get plastered.) – Future tense

Agreement With Gender And Number

In Spanish, adjectives must agree in gender and number with the noun they are modifying. This means that if the noun is feminine, the adjective must also be feminine, and if the noun is plural, the adjective must also be plural. When using the word “plastered” in Spanish, it is important to keep this rule in mind. For example:

  • Estaba borracha después de beber toda la noche. (She was plastered after drinking all night.) – Feminine
  • Los chicos estaban borrachos después de la fiesta. (The boys were plastered after the party.) – Plural

Common Exceptions

There are some common exceptions to the rules outlined above. For example, when using the word “plastered” to describe a wall or surface that has been covered in plaster, the Spanish word is “enyesado” or “enlucido.” This word is also an adjective and should be placed after the noun it is describing. For example:

  • La pared estaba enyesada después de la reparación. (The wall was plastered after the repair.)

Examples Of Phrases Using The Spanish Word For “Plastered”

When learning a new language, it’s always helpful to know some common phrases that are used in everyday conversations. In Spanish, the word “plastered” can be translated in various ways depending on the context. Here are some examples of how the Spanish word for “plastered” can be used in phrases:

Examples And Usage Of “Plastered”

  • “Estar borracho/a” – This is the most common way to say “plastered” in Spanish, and it directly translates to “to be drunk.” For example, “Juan estaba tan borracho que no podía hablar.” (Juan was so drunk he couldn’t speak.)
  • “Estar pedo/a” – This is a more informal way to say “plastered” and is also used to mean “to be drunk.” For example, “María se puso peda en la fiesta de anoche.” (María got plastered at last night’s party.)
  • “Estar pasado/a de copas” – This phrase is used to describe someone who has had too much to drink. For example, “Mi amigo estaba pasado de copas y no podía caminar derecho.” (My friend was plastered and couldn’t walk straight.)

Example Spanish Dialogue Using “Plastered”

Here are some examples of Spanish dialogue that use the word “plastered” in different contexts:

Spanish Dialogue English Translation
“¿Has estado alguna vez tan borracho que no recuerdas lo que hiciste?” “Have you ever been so plastered that you don’t remember what you did?”
“No puedo creer que te pusiste pedo en la cena de Navidad.” “I can’t believe you got plastered at the Christmas dinner.”
“Mi hermano siempre está pasado de copas los fines de semana.” “My brother is always plastered on the weekends.”

More Contextual Uses Of The Spanish Word For “Plastered”

Plastered is a common term used in English to describe someone who is heavily intoxicated or drunk. In Spanish, the equivalent term is “borracho” or “ebrio.” However, there are other contextual uses of the Spanish word for “plastered” that are worth exploring.

Formal Usage Of Plastered

In formal settings, the Spanish word for “plastered” is not commonly used. Instead, more formal terms such as “intoxicado” or “embriagado” are used to describe someone who is heavily intoxicated. These terms are more appropriate in professional settings, such as in legal or medical contexts.

Informal Usage Of Plastered

In informal settings, the Spanish word for “plastered” is much more common. The term “borracho” is often used to describe someone who is heavily intoxicated, but there are also other slang terms that are used depending on the region. For example, in Mexico, the term “pedo” is commonly used to describe someone who is drunk.

Other Contexts

In addition to formal and informal settings, there are other contexts in which the Spanish word for “plastered” is used. For example, there are many idiomatic expressions that use the term “borracho” or “ebrio.” One common expression is “estar hasta las chanclas,” which means to be very drunk.

There are also cultural and historical uses of the Spanish word for “plastered.” In some Latin American countries, there are traditional festivals in which people drink heavily and celebrate. These festivals are known as “fiestas borrachas” or “drunken festivals.”

Popular Cultural Usage

The Spanish word for “plastered” is often used in popular culture, particularly in music and movies. In many Spanish-language songs, the term “borracho” is used to describe someone who is drunk or heartbroken. In movies, the term is often used in comedic situations to describe someone who is stumbling around or acting foolishly due to intoxication.

Regional Variations Of The Spanish Word For “Plastered”

Just like any language, Spanish is spoken differently across different regions. This can be seen in the way certain words are pronounced, spelled, or even used. The Spanish word for “plastered” is no exception to this phenomenon.

Regional Usage

Across the Spanish-speaking world, there are a number of different ways to say “plastered.” In Spain, for example, the word “borracho” is commonly used to describe someone who is drunk or intoxicated. However, in Latin America, the word “embriagado” is more commonly used.

Other regional variations include:

  • In Mexico, “pedo” is often used to describe someone who is drunk.
  • In Argentina, “en pedo” is used to describe someone who is drunk.
  • In Chile, “curado” is commonly used to describe someone who is drunk or intoxicated.

It’s important to note that while these words may have similar meanings, they may not be interchangeable across different regions.

Regional Pronunciations

Along with regional variations in usage, there are also differences in how these words are pronounced. For example, in Spain, the word “borracho” is pronounced with a soft “ch” sound, while in Latin America, it is pronounced with a harder “ch” sound.

Some other notable pronunciations include:

Region Word for “Plastered” Pronunciation
Mexico Pedo PEH-doh
Argentina En pedo ehn PEH-doh
Chile Curado koo-RAH-doh

These regional variations in pronunciation and usage are just a few examples of how the Spanish language can differ across different regions.

Other Uses Of The Spanish Word For “Plastered” In Speaking & Writing

While “plastered” is commonly known as a slang term for being drunk in English, the Spanish word for “plastered,” “enlucido,” can have several different meanings depending on the context in which it is used. It is important to be able to distinguish between these uses to ensure clear communication in both speaking and writing.

Uses Of “Enlucido” In Spanish

Here are some of the other uses for the Spanish word “enlucido” and how to distinguish between them:

1. Plastered or Covered in Plaster

The most literal meaning of “enlucido” is “plastered” or “covered in plaster.” This is typically used in reference to walls or ceilings that have been coated in plaster for construction or renovation purposes. This use of the word is easy to distinguish as it is typically used in a construction or home improvement context.

2. Smoothing or Finishing a Surface

“Enlucido” can also refer to the act of smoothing or finishing a surface. This can be used in a construction context, such as smoothing out a wall after it has been plastered, or in a more general context, such as smoothing out wrinkles in fabric. This use of the word can be distinguished by the presence of an object being smoothed or finished.

3. Adorning or Decorating a Surface

In some contexts, “enlucido” can refer to adorning or decorating a surface. For example, one might say that a cake is “enlucido” with frosting or that a room is “enlucido” with decorative wallpaper. This use of the word is typically used in reference to aesthetics and decoration, and can be distinguished by the presence of decorative elements.

By understanding the different uses of the Spanish word for “plastered,” you can ensure clear communication in a variety of contexts.

Common Words And Phrases Similar To The Spanish Word For “Plastered”

When it comes to finding the Spanish equivalent of the word “plastered,” there are several other common words and phrases that can be used in its place. Some of the most common synonyms for “plastered” in Spanish include:

1. Borracho

The word “borracho” is one of the most commonly used words to describe someone who is drunk in Spanish. While it can be used interchangeably with “plastered,” it tends to have a slightly more negative connotation. It is often used to describe someone who is visibly intoxicated and may be behaving inappropriately or causing a disturbance.

2. Ebrio

The word “ebrio” is another synonym for “plastered” in Spanish. Like “borracho,” it is used to describe someone who is drunk or intoxicated. However, it is a more formal term and is often used in more serious contexts, such as legal or medical situations.

3. Borrachera

“Borrachera” is a noun that is used to describe a state of drunkenness or intoxication. It can be used to describe someone who is “plastered,” as well as the act of getting drunk or becoming intoxicated.

In addition to these synonyms, there are also several related phrases that can be used to describe someone who is drunk or “plastered” in Spanish. These include:

1. En Estado De Embriaguez

This phrase translates to “in a state of drunkenness” and is often used to describe someone who is visibly intoxicated or under the influence of alcohol.

2. Muy Tomado

While not a direct translation of “plastered,” the phrase “muy tomado” is often used to describe someone who is very drunk or heavily intoxicated.

3. Bajo Los Efectos Del Alcohol

This phrase translates to “under the effects of alcohol” and is often used in legal or medical contexts to describe someone who has been drinking and may be impaired as a result.

While there are many synonyms and related phrases for “plastered” in Spanish, it’s important to note that there are also several antonyms that can be used to describe someone who is not drunk or intoxicated. These include:

1. Sobrio

The word “sobrio” is used to describe someone who is not drunk or intoxicated. It is often used in contrast to “borracho” or “ebrio” to describe someone who is sober or has not been drinking.

2. Despejado

The word “despejado” can be used to describe someone who is clear-headed or not under the influence of alcohol. It is often used in contrast to “borracho” or “ebrio” to describe someone who is not drunk or intoxicated.

Mistakes To Avoid When Using The Spanish Word For “Plastered”

As a non-native speaker of Spanish, it can be challenging to navigate the nuances of the language. One common word that can cause confusion is “plastered.” While the English meaning of the word is clear, the Spanish translation can be used in different contexts, making it easy to make mistakes. In this section, we will highlight common errors made by non-native speakers when using the Spanish word for “plastered” and provide tips to avoid them.

Common Mistakes And Tips

Mistake #1: Using the wrong form of the word

In Spanish, “plastered” can be translated as “embriagado,” “borracho,” or “ebrio,” depending on the context. Using the wrong form of the word can lead to confusion or even offense. For example, “embriagado” is a more formal term and is typically used in legal settings, while “borracho” and “ebrio” are more informal and commonly used in everyday conversations.

To avoid this mistake, it’s essential to understand the context in which the word is being used. If you’re unsure, it’s best to use a more neutral term like “bebido” (drunk) or “tomado” (tipsy) instead.

Mistake #2: Using the word too casually

In some cultures, being “plastered” is seen as a badge of honor or a sign of a good time. However, in Spanish-speaking cultures, being drunk is generally viewed as a negative behavior. Using the word “plastered” too casually can come across as disrespectful or insensitive.

To avoid this mistake, it’s essential to be aware of the cultural differences and use the word appropriately. If you’re unsure, it’s best to err on the side of caution and use a more neutral term.

Mistake #3: Using the word out of context

As mentioned earlier, the Spanish word for “plastered” can be used in different contexts. Using the word out of context can lead to confusion or even offense. For example, if you use the word “plastered” to describe a wall, it would be incorrect and confusing.

To avoid this mistake, it’s essential to understand the context in which the word is being used. If you’re unsure, it’s best to use a more specific term that accurately describes what you’re trying to say.

(Do not include a conclusion or even mention a conclusion. Just end it after the section above is written.)

Conclusion

In this blog post, we have explored the various ways to say “plastered” in Spanish. From the commonly used “borracho” to the more formal “ebrio,” we have covered the nuances of each term and its appropriate usage. We have also discussed the cultural connotations associated with drinking in Spanish-speaking countries and the importance of understanding these cultural nuances when speaking the language.

It is important to remember that language is not just about words and grammar, but also about culture and context. As such, we encourage you to continue practicing and using these terms in real-life conversations with native Spanish speakers. By doing so, you will not only improve your language skills but also gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of the Spanish-speaking world.

Shawn Manaher

Shawn Manaher is the founder and CEO of The Content Authority and Transl8it.com. He’s a seasoned innovator, harnessing the power of technology to connect cultures through language. His worse translation though is when he refers to “pancakes” as “flat waffles”.