How Do You Say “Impermissible” In Spanish?

Learning a new language is always an exciting endeavor. It opens up new doors of communication, enhances cultural understanding, and improves cognitive abilities. Spanish, in particular, is a language that is widely spoken throughout the world. It is the official language of 21 countries, including Spain, Mexico, and most of Central and South America. If you are looking to expand your Spanish vocabulary, you may be wondering how to say “impermissible” in Spanish. The Spanish translation of “impermissible” is “inadmisible”.

How Do You Pronounce The Spanish Word For “Impermissible”?

Learning to properly pronounce a word in a different language can be a challenge, but it’s an important step in effective communication. The Spanish word for “impermissible” is “inadmisible”. It’s pronounced “een-ad-mee-SEE-bleh”.

Phonetic Breakdown

Here’s a phonetic breakdown of the word:

Spanish Phonetic
in een
ad ad
mi mee
si SEE
ble bleh

Tips For Pronunciation

Here are some tips for pronouncing “inadmisible” correctly:

  • Start by pronouncing each syllable separately: “een-ad-mee-SEE-bleh”.
  • Pay attention to the stress on the second-to-last syllable: “mee”. This syllable should be pronounced with more emphasis than the others.
  • Practice saying the word slowly at first, then gradually speed up your pronunciation until it sounds natural.
  • Listen to native Spanish speakers pronounce the word to get a better sense of the correct pronunciation.

Proper Grammatical Use Of The Spanish Word For “Impermissible”

Correct grammar is essential when using the Spanish word for “impermissible” to ensure that your message is accurately conveyed. Improper use of this word can result in confusion and misunderstandings, which could lead to serious consequences.

Placement Of “Impermissible” In Sentences

The Spanish word for “impermissible” is “inadmisible.” It is an adjective that can be placed before or after the noun it modifies. For example:

  • El comportamiento inadmisible del empleado resultó en su despido. (The employee’s impermissible behavior resulted in his dismissal.)
  • La conducta del empleado fue inadmisible. (The employee’s behavior was impermissible.)

Verb Conjugations Or Tenses

When using “inadmisible” in a sentence, it does not require any verb conjugations or tenses. However, it is important to use the correct verb tense in the sentence to ensure that the message is conveyed accurately.

Agreement With Gender And Number

Like most Spanish adjectives, “inadmisible” must agree with the gender and number of the noun it modifies. For example:

  • El comportamiento inadmisible del empleado (masculine singular noun)
  • La conducta inadmisible de la empleada (feminine singular noun)
  • Los comentarios inadmisibles de los empleados (masculine plural noun)
  • Las acciones inadmisibles de las empleadas (feminine plural noun)

Common Exceptions

There are no common exceptions when it comes to using “inadmisible” in Spanish. However, it is important to note that there may be cultural differences in what is considered impermissible in different Spanish-speaking countries. Therefore, it is important to be mindful of cultural nuances when using this term.

Examples Of Phrases Using The Spanish Word For “Impermissible”

When communicating in Spanish, it’s important to know how to express that something is impermissible. In this section, we will explore some common phrases that use the Spanish word for “impermissible” and provide examples of how to use them in sentences.

Phrases Using “Impermissible”

  • No está permitido – It is not allowed
  • No se permite – It is not permitted
  • No es aceptable – It is not acceptable
  • No es tolerable – It is not tolerable
  • No es admisible – It is not admissible

These phrases are commonly used in formal and informal situations to express that something is not allowed or acceptable.

Examples Of Usage

Below are some examples of how to use these phrases in sentences:

  • No está permitido fumar aquí – Smoking is not allowed here.
  • No se permite el uso de cámaras en el museo – The use of cameras is not permitted in the museum.
  • No es aceptable hablar con la boca llena – It is not acceptable to talk with your mouth full.
  • No es tolerable el acoso en el lugar de trabajo – Harassment in the workplace is not tolerable.
  • No es admisible el plagio en la universidad – Plagiarism is not admissible in university.

Example Dialogue

Here is an example conversation using the Spanish word for “impermissible”:

Spanish English Translation
Persona 1: ¿Puedo fumar aquí? Person 1: Can I smoke here?
Persona 2: No está permitido fumar aquí. Hay un área designada para fumar afuera. Person 2: Smoking is not allowed here. There is a designated smoking area outside.

This dialogue demonstrates how to use the phrase “no está permitido” to express that smoking is not allowed in a certain area.

More Contextual Uses Of The Spanish Word For “Impermissible”

Understanding the contextual uses of the Spanish word for “impermissible” can help you communicate more effectively in various situations. Here are some different contexts where the word might be used:

Formal Usage Of Impermissible

In formal settings, such as legal or academic contexts, the word for “impermissible” in Spanish is often used to describe actions or behaviors that are not allowed or prohibited by law or regulation. For example, a lawyer might use the term to refer to evidence that was obtained illegally and therefore cannot be used in court.

Informal Usage Of Impermissible

In more casual settings, such as everyday conversation, the word for “impermissible” might be used to describe actions or behaviors that are simply not socially acceptable or considered inappropriate. For example, someone might say that it is “impermissible” to wear a hat indoors or to speak loudly in a library.

Other Contexts

There are also other contexts where the word for “impermissible” might be used in Spanish, such as in slang, idiomatic expressions, or cultural/historical uses. For example, in some Latin American countries, the word “impermissible” might be used to describe something that is considered taboo or forbidden due to cultural or religious reasons.

Here are some other examples of how the word might be used in different contexts:

  • In Mexican slang, the word “impermissible” (imperdonable) might be used to describe something that is unforgivable or outrageous.
  • In some idiomatic expressions, the word might be used to describe something that is impossible or out of the question. For example, someone might say that it is “impermissible” for them to miss their best friend’s wedding.
  • In historical contexts, the word might be used to describe actions or behaviors that were not allowed during a certain period of time. For example, during the Spanish Inquisition, many books were considered “impermissible” and were banned or burned.

Popular Cultural Usage

Finally, there may be popular cultural usage of the word for “impermissible” in Spanish, depending on the country or region you are in. For example, in some Latin American countries, the word might be used in popular music or movies to describe actions or behaviors that are considered taboo or forbidden.

Overall, understanding the different contextual uses of the word for “impermissible” in Spanish can help you navigate various situations and communicate more effectively with others.

Regional Variations Of The Spanish Word For “Impermissible”

Just like any other language, Spanish also has regional variations in terms of vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation. These variations are influenced by several factors such as history, culture, and geography. Therefore, it is not surprising to find that the Spanish word for “impermissible” has different variations in different Spanish-speaking countries.

Usage Of “Impermissible” In Different Spanish-speaking Countries

Although the Spanish language is spoken in many countries around the world, there are some differences in how certain words are used and understood. The word “impermissible” is one such word that has different variations in different Spanish-speaking countries. Here are some examples:

  • Spain: In Spain, the word “impermissible” is usually translated as “inadmisible”. This word is commonly used in legal and formal contexts to indicate something that is not allowed or that goes against the law.
  • Mexico: In Mexico, the word “impermissible” can be translated as “prohibido” or “ilegal”. These words are used to indicate something that is not allowed or that is against the law.
  • Argentina: In Argentina, the word “impermissible” can be translated as “inadmisible” or “no permitido”. These words are used to indicate something that is not allowed or that is against the rules.

Regional Pronunciations

Aside from differences in vocabulary and usage, there are also differences in how the Spanish word for “impermissible” is pronounced in different regions. Here are some examples:

Country Pronunciation
Spain in-ad-mi-SEE-bleh
Mexico pro-ee-bee-doh
Argentina in-ad-mi-SEE-bleh

It is important to note that these are just some examples of regional variations in the Spanish language. There are many other variations that exist, and it is always a good idea to be aware of them when communicating with Spanish speakers from different regions.

Other Uses Of The Spanish Word For “Impermissible” In Speaking & Writing

Although “impermissible” is a common translation for the Spanish word “impermissible,” it is important to note that this term can have different meanings depending on the context in which it is used. Understanding these nuances can help you communicate more effectively in Spanish.

Distinguishing Between Different Uses

One common use of “impermissible” in Spanish is to describe something that is prohibited or not allowed. For example, you might use this term to describe a behavior that is against the law or a rule. In this context, “impermissible” can be translated as “prohibido,” “no permitido,” or “ilegal,” depending on the situation.

Another use of “impermissible” in Spanish is to describe something that is inappropriate or unacceptable. For example, you might use this term to describe a comment or action that is offensive or rude. In this context, “impermissible” can be translated as “inapropiado,” “inaceptable,” or “ofensivo.”

It is important to note that in some cases, the line between these two uses of “impermissible” can be blurry. For example, something that is not explicitly prohibited by law or rules may still be considered inappropriate or unacceptable in certain contexts. In these cases, it is important to consider the specific situation and the cultural norms that apply.

Examples

Here are a few examples to illustrate the different uses of “impermissible” in Spanish:

Use Example Translation
Prohibited El uso de drogas es impermisible en esta propiedad. Drug use is prohibited on this property.
Inappropriate El comentario que hiciste fue impermissible e irrespetuoso. The comment you made was inappropriate and disrespectful.

By understanding the different uses of “impermissible” in Spanish, you can more effectively communicate your ideas and avoid misunderstandings.

Common Words And Phrases Similar To The Spanish Word For “Impermissible”

When it comes to finding synonyms or related terms for “impermissible” in Spanish, there are a few options to consider. Here are some common words and phrases that are similar in meaning:

Prohibido

One of the most common words used to convey the meaning of “impermissible” in Spanish is “prohibido.” This term is often used to indicate that something is not allowed or is against the rules. For example, “Fumar está prohibido en este edificio” means “Smoking is prohibited in this building.” Like “impermissible,” “prohibido” is a strong and authoritative term that emphasizes the seriousness of the prohibition.

Vetado

Another term that is often used to convey the idea of “impermissible” in Spanish is “vetado.” This term is similar to “prohibido” in that it indicates that something is forbidden or not allowed. However, “vetado” is often used in a more formal or official context, such as when discussing government policies or regulations. For example, “El acceso a esta zona está vetado” means “Access to this area is prohibited.”

Inadmisible

While “prohibido” and “vetado” both emphasize the idea of something being forbidden or not allowed, “inadmisible” is more focused on the idea of something being unacceptable or inappropriate. This term is often used in a legal or ethical context, such as when discussing behavior that is considered to be morally wrong or legally prohibited. For example, “Es inadmisible que se permita la discriminación en el lugar de trabajo” means “It is unacceptable to allow discrimination in the workplace.”

Antonyms

While it’s important to understand synonyms and related terms for “impermissible” in Spanish, it’s also useful to know antonyms – that is, words that have the opposite meaning. Here are a few antonyms to consider:

  • Permitido (allowed)
  • Aceptable (acceptable)
  • Legal (legal)

Understanding both the synonyms and antonyms for “impermissible” in Spanish can help you communicate more effectively and accurately in a variety of contexts.

Mistakes To Avoid When Using The Spanish Word For “Impermissible”

When it comes to speaking a foreign language, making mistakes is a common occurrence. Spanish is no exception, and many non-native speakers often struggle with certain words and phrases. One such word that can be tricky to use correctly is “impermissible.” In this section, we will discuss common mistakes made when using the Spanish word for “impermissible” and provide tips to avoid them.

Common Mistakes

One of the most common mistakes made when using the Spanish word for “impermissible” is using the wrong word altogether. The word “impermissible” is often confused with “impossible,” which means “imposible” in Spanish. Another common mistake is using the word “prohibido,” which means “forbidden,” instead of “impermissible.”

Another mistake that is often made is using the wrong form of the word “impermissible.” In Spanish, the word “impermissible” can be translated as “inadmisible” or “no permitido.” However, it is important to use the correct form of the word depending on the context in which it is being used.

Tips To Avoid Mistakes

To avoid making mistakes when using the Spanish word for “impermissible,” it is important to practice using the word in context. This can be done by reading and listening to Spanish language materials, such as books, music, and podcasts. Additionally, it is helpful to use a Spanish-English dictionary to ensure that the correct word is being used.

Another tip to avoid mistakes is to pay attention to the context in which the word is being used. Depending on the situation, different forms of the word “impermissible” may be more appropriate. For example, if discussing a legal matter, the word “inadmisible” may be more appropriate than “no permitido.”

Conclusion

In this blog post, we have explored the meaning and usage of the word “impermissible” in English. We have learned that impermissible refers to something that is not allowed or prohibited by law, rules, or regulations. Additionally, we have discussed various synonyms and antonyms of impermissible, such as permissible, legal, authorized, and prohibited.

Furthermore, we have explored the translation of impermissible in Spanish, which is “inadmisible.” We have discussed the usage of this word in different contexts, such as legal, ethical, and moral situations. Additionally, we have provided examples of how to use inadmisible in Spanish sentences.

Encouragement To Practice And Use Impermissible In Real-life Conversations.

Learning a new word like impermissible is a great way to expand your vocabulary and improve your language skills. We encourage you to practice using this word in your daily conversations, whether it be in English or Spanish. By doing so, you will become more confident in your language abilities and be able to express yourself more effectively.

Remember, using impermissible in the right context and with the correct pronunciation is key to making a good impression. So, keep practicing and using this word in your everyday life, and you will soon become a master of the English and Spanish languages!

Shawn Manaher

Shawn Manaher is the founder and CEO of The Content Authority and Transl8it.com. He’s a seasoned innovator, harnessing the power of technology to connect cultures through language. His worse translation though is when he refers to “pancakes” as “flat waffles”.