How Do You Say “At The Following Times” In French?

French is a beautiful language that is spoken by millions of people around the world. It is a language that is rich in culture and history, and it is no wonder why so many people are interested in learning it. If you are one of those people, then you have come to the right place. In this article, we will be discussing how to say certain phrases in French, specifically “at the following times”.

So, without further ado, let’s dive into the world of French language and explore the different ways to express time in this beautiful language.

At the following times in French can be translated to “aux heures suivantes” in French.

How Do You Pronounce The French Word For “At The Following Times”?

If you’re learning French, you know how important it is to properly pronounce words. One word that you may come across is “à ces moments-là,” which means “at the following times.” Properly pronouncing this phrase will help you communicate effectively with French speakers. Here’s how to do it:

Phonetic Breakdown

French Phonetic English
à ah to/at
ces say these
moments moh-moh moments
lah there

The phrase is pronounced “ah say moh-moh lah.” Remember to stress the second syllable in “moments.”

Tips For Pronunciation

  • Practice pronouncing each syllable separately before putting them together.
  • Listen to native French speakers say the phrase and try to imitate their pronunciation.
  • Pay attention to the stress on the second syllable in “moments.”
  • Remember to pronounce the “s” in “ces.”

Proper Grammatical Use Of The French Word For “At The Following Times”

Proper grammar is essential when using the French word for “at the following times.” Incorrect usage can lead to misunderstandings and confusion. The French language has specific rules for using this word, and it is important to follow them to convey meaning accurately.

Placement Of The French Word For “At The Following Times” In Sentences

The French word for “at the following times” is “à,” which is a preposition. This preposition is placed before the time expressions to indicate when an action took place. For example:

  • Je suis arrivé à midi. (I arrived at noon.)
  • Elle partira à six heures. (She will leave at six o’clock.)

It is essential to note that in French, the word order in a sentence is different from English. The preposition “à” comes before the time expression, whereas in English, it comes after.

Verb Conjugations Or Tenses

The use of the preposition “à” does not affect verb conjugations or tenses. The verb tense used in a sentence depends on the context and the speaker’s intention. For example:

  • J’ai mangé à midi. (I ate at noon.) – past tense
  • Je vais manger à midi. (I am going to eat at noon.) – future tense

Agreement With Gender And Number

The preposition “à” does not change based on gender or number. It remains the same regardless of the noun’s gender or number it is referring to. For example:

  • Je suis allé à la plage. (I went to the beach.) – feminine noun
  • Il est parti à la montagne. (He left for the mountains.) – masculine noun

Common Exceptions

There are some common exceptions to using the preposition “à” for specific time expressions. For example:

  • À midi (at noon) and à minuit (at midnight) do not require the preposition “à.”
  • When referring to specific days of the week, the preposition “le” is used instead of “à.” For example, “Je vais au travail le lundi” (I go to work on Monday).

It is essential to keep these exceptions in mind when using the preposition “à” to avoid errors in grammar.

Examples Of Phrases Using The French Word For “At The Following Times”

French is a beautiful language that is spoken by millions of people around the world. It is a language that is known for its complex grammar rules and unique pronunciation. One of the most important words in the French language is “à” which means “at” or “to”. In this section, we will explore some common phrases that include the French word “à” and how they are used in sentences.

Examples Of Phrases

Phrase Translation Usage
à midi at noon Je vais déjeuner à midi. (I am going to have lunch at noon.)
à minuit at midnight Nous allons fêter le Nouvel An à minuit. (We are going to celebrate New Year’s at midnight.)
à l’aube at dawn Les oiseaux chantent à l’aube. (The birds sing at dawn.)
à la tombée de la nuit at dusk Nous aimons nous promener à la tombée de la nuit. (We like to take a walk at dusk.)
à la fin at the end Le film est très triste à la fin. (The movie is very sad at the end.)

As you can see, the French word “à” is used in a variety of phrases that relate to time. These phrases are commonly used in day-to-day conversations and are important to know if you want to speak French fluently.

Example French Dialogue

Here is an example dialogue between two friends discussing their plans for the evening:

Marie: Qu’est-ce que tu fais ce soir? (What are you doing tonight?)

Luc: Je vais au cinéma à huit heures. (I am going to the movies at eight o’clock.)

Marie: Ah, je vois. Et après le cinéma? (Ah, I see. And after the movies?)

Luc: Nous allons aller boire un verre à la fin. (We are going to have a drink at the end.)

In this dialogue, you can see how the French word “à” is used to express time and location. It is an important word to know if you want to speak French fluently and have conversations with native speakers.

More Contextual Uses Of The French Word For “At The Following Times”

When it comes to using the French word for “at the following times,” there are various contexts in which it can be used. In this section, we will discuss some of the most common contexts in which this word can be used.

Formal Usage

Formal usage of the French word for “at the following times” is often seen in written documents such as legal contracts, academic papers, and official government documents. In these contexts, the word is used to specify a particular time or date with precision and accuracy. For example:

  • “The meeting will be held at the following times: Monday, August 10th at 10:00am and Wednesday, August 12th at 2:00pm.”
  • “The deadline for submission of the report is at the following times: Friday, September 4th at 5:00pm.”

Informal Usage

Informal usage of the French word for “at the following times” is more commonly seen in spoken language and casual writing. In these contexts, the word is often used to give a general idea of when something will happen without specifying an exact time or date. For example:

  • “We should meet up at the following times next week to discuss our plans.”
  • “I usually go to the gym at the following times in the morning.”

Other Contexts

Besides formal and informal usage, the French word for “at the following times” can also be used in other contexts such as slang, idiomatic expressions, or cultural/historical uses. For example:

  • “Je suis dispo aux horaires suivants” (I’m available at the following times) – a common phrase used in French dating culture.
  • “Les horaires suivants sont à titre indicatif” (The following times are indicative) – a phrase used in French train schedules.

Popular Cultural Usage

One popular cultural usage of the French word for “at the following times” is in the title of the popular French film “Les Horaires Inversés” (The Inverted Times). The film explores the concept of time travel and the consequences of changing the course of history.

Regional Variations Of The French Word For “At The Following Times”

French is spoken in many countries around the world, and just like any other language, it has regional variations. One of the words that vary across regions is “at the following times.” Depending on the country or region, this term can be pronounced and used differently.

Usage In Different French-speaking Countries

French is an official language in 29 countries, and each of these countries has its own dialects and variations. For example, in France, the term “at the following times” is commonly expressed as “aux horaires suivants.” In Canada, particularly in Quebec, the same term is expressed as “aux heures suivantes.” In Switzerland, the term is expressed as “aux moments suivants.”

It is essential to note that the difference in dialects and variations can also affect the spelling of the word or phrase. For instance, in Belgium, the word “suivants” is spelled as “suivantes” when referring to a feminine object.

Regional Pronunciations

Pronunciation is another aspect of language that varies across regions. The word “at the following times” is pronounced differently in different French-speaking countries. For instance, in France, the word “aux” is pronounced as “oh,” while in Canada, it is pronounced as “ohx.” In Switzerland, the pronunciation is “oh-z.”

It is also important to note that within the same country, there may be variations in pronunciation. In France, for example, the pronunciation of the word “aux” can vary from one region to another. In the north, it may be pronounced as “oh,” while in the south, it may be pronounced as “o.”

Below is a table summarizing the different regional variations of the French word for “at the following times” in some French-speaking countries:

Country Term Pronunciation
France aux horaires suivants “oh” (north), “o” (south)
Canada (Quebec) aux heures suivantes “ohx”
Switzerland aux moments suivants “oh-z”

Other Uses Of The French Word For “At The Following Times” In Speaking & Writing

While the French word for “at the following times” – “aux horaires suivants” – is commonly used to indicate specific times, it can also have different meanings depending on the context in which it is used. Here are some other uses of this phrase:

1. Referring To Business Hours

One of the most common uses of “aux horaires suivants” is to refer to business hours. This can include the operating hours of a store, office, or any other type of business. For example:

  • La boutique est ouverte aux horaires suivants : du lundi au samedi de 9h à 18h.
  • The store is open at the following times: Monday to Saturday from 9am to 6pm.

2. Indicating A Schedule Or Timetable

“Aux horaires suivants” can also be used to describe a schedule or timetable for a particular event or activity. This can include the start and end times of a class, a train schedule, or a program of events. For instance:

  • Voici les horaires suivants pour la conférence : 9h – 9h15 : Accueil des participants, 9h15 – 10h30 : Présentation des intervenants, 10h30 – 11h : Pause-café, 11h – 12h30 : Table ronde.
  • Here are the following times for the conference: 9am – 9:15am: Participant check-in, 9:15am – 10:30am: Speaker presentations, 10:30am – 11am: Coffee break, 11am – 12:30pm: Roundtable discussion.

3. Describing A Period Of Time

In some cases, “aux horaires suivants” can be used to describe a period of time rather than a specific time or schedule. This can include a range of dates or a general timeframe for an event or activity. For example:

  • Les soldes ont lieu aux horaires suivants : du 1er juillet au 31 août.
  • The sales take place at the following times: from July 1st to August 31st.

When using “aux horaires suivants” in conversation or writing, it’s important to pay attention to the context in which it is used in order to determine its intended meaning. Whether it’s used to describe business hours, a schedule, or a period of time, this versatile phrase is a useful tool for communicating specific information in French.

Common Words And Phrases Similar To The French Word For “At The Following Times”

When it comes to expressing time in French, “à” is the go-to preposition for indicating a specific moment in time. However, there are other words and phrases that can be used in similar contexts. Here are some synonyms and related terms to “at the following times” in French:

Similar Words And Phrases

  • À partir de: This phrase means “starting from” or “as of.” It is often used to indicate the beginning of a period of time. For example, “Je serai en vacances à partir de vendredi” (I will be on vacation starting from Friday).
  • À compter de: This phrase is similar to “à partir de” and means “as of” or “starting from.” It can also be used to indicate the beginning of a period of time. For example, “Le nouveau règlement sera en vigueur à compter de demain” (The new regulation will be in effect as of tomorrow).
  • À la suite de: This phrase means “following” or “as a result of.” It is often used to indicate a causal relationship between two events. For example, “À la suite de la pandémie, de nombreuses entreprises ont dû fermer” (Following the pandemic, many businesses had to close).
  • Après: This preposition means “after” and is often used to indicate a point in time that comes after another point in time. For example, “Je te verrai après le travail” (I will see you after work).
  • En: This preposition can be used to indicate a period of time or a moment in time. For example, “Je vais au cinéma en soirée” (I am going to the cinema in the evening) or “Je vais au cinéma en ce moment” (I am going to the cinema right now).

Differences And Similarities

While these words and phrases may be similar to “at the following times” in certain contexts, they are not always interchangeable. For example, “à” is the most commonly used preposition to indicate a specific moment in time, while “en” is more often used to indicate a period of time. “À partir de” and “à compter de” are both used to indicate the beginning of a period of time, but “à compter de” is considered more formal. “À la suite de” is used to indicate a causal relationship, while “après” simply indicates a point in time that comes after another point in time.

Antonyms

Antonyms for “at the following times” would include words and phrases that indicate a lack of specificity or a general sense of time. For example:

  • Avant: This preposition means “before” and is often used to indicate a point in time that comes before another point in time. For example, “Je dois terminer ce projet avant le week-end” (I have to finish this project before the weekend).
  • Pendant: This preposition can be used to indicate a period of time or a moment in time, but it often implies a sense of duration or continuity. For example, “Il a travaillé pendant des heures” (He worked for hours).
  • Depuis: This preposition is used to indicate a point in time that marks the beginning of a period of time that has continued up until the present. For example, “Je travaille ici depuis cinq ans” (I have been working here for five years).
  • Jusqu’à: This preposition means “until” and is often used to indicate a point in time that marks the end of a period of time. For example, “Je vais travailler jusqu’à six heures” (I am going to work until six o’clock).

Mistakes To Avoid When Using The French Word For “At The Following Times”

When learning a new language, it’s common to make mistakes, especially when it comes to prepositions. In French, the word for “at” is “à”, and it’s used in a variety of contexts, including talking about time. However, non-native speakers often make mistakes when using “à” to talk about specific times. In this section, we’ll discuss some of the most common mistakes and provide tips to avoid them.

Common Mistakes

One of the most common mistakes non-native speakers make when using “à” to talk about time is forgetting to include the article “le” or “la”. In French, specific times require an article, whereas in English, we often omit the article. For example, in English, we might say “I’ll meet you at 3 pm”, but in French, we would say “Je vous retrouverai à la trois heures”.

Another mistake is using “à” instead of “de” when talking about duration. In French, we use “de” to talk about how long something lasts, whereas “à” is used for specific times. For example, “Je travaille de 9 heures à 5 heures” means “I work from 9 am to 5 pm”, whereas “Je travaille à 9 heures” means “I work at 9 am”.

Finally, non-native speakers often forget to use the 24-hour clock when expressing time in French. In France, the 24-hour clock is used much more frequently than the 12-hour clock, and it’s important to know how to use it correctly. For example, instead of saying “Il est 2 heures de l’après-midi”, you would say “Il est 14 heures”.

Tips To Avoid These Mistakes

To avoid forgetting the article “le” or “la”, try to think of specific times in French as phrases rather than just numbers. For example, instead of thinking of “3 pm” as just a time, think of it as “la trois heures”. This will help you remember to include the article.

To remember when to use “de” and when to use “à”, try to think of “de” as meaning “from” and “à” as meaning “at”. This will help you remember that “de” is used for duration and “à” is used for specific times.

To get comfortable with the 24-hour clock, start practicing using it in your everyday life. Instead of saying “It’s 2 pm”, try saying “It’s 14 hours”. This will help you get used to the 24-hour clock and make it easier to use when speaking French.

Conclusion

In conclusion, learning how to say at the following times in French can greatly enhance your communication skills in the language. Here are the key points to remember:

  • There are specific prepositions to use for each time of day or period of time.
  • The 24-hour clock is commonly used in France and other French-speaking countries.
  • It is important to pay attention to gender and pluralization when using these prepositions.

Now that you have a better understanding of how to use these prepositions, it is important to practice them in real-life conversations. Don’t be afraid to use them when speaking with native French speakers, as it shows your dedication to learning the language and can improve your overall fluency. Keep practicing and soon enough, using these prepositions will become second nature.

Shawn Manaher

Shawn Manaher is the founder and CEO of The Content Authority and Transl8it.com. He’s a seasoned innovator, harnessing the power of technology to connect cultures through language. His worse translation though is when he refers to “pancakes” as “flat waffles”.